Wed Poets Society

THE CRUMBCAST 11

61 comments

  1. a full, varied and interesting and satisfying life….
    you don’t know how much I appreciate that !! Seriously.

    If I met breasts I’d scold them… lol Chestsicles! lol you are a sick man. lol lol lol
    Your comedic timing is awesome. The way you ended the podcast was perfect.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha ha! Thank you, Faith! This was certainly meant to be a bit of lighthearted fun, but also a somewhat heartfelt “love letter” to breasts everywhere. Hm. That didn’t sound right. Oh well, I’m sure you know what I mean. πŸ˜›

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  2. Oh, Tony. I kind of want to slap you and flash you at the same time. No! I’m kidding! πŸ˜€ That was extremely entertaining the whole way through. I loved it!

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    1. Ha ha ha! That was the perfect response, Vic. Thanks so much for taking this in the spirit that was intended! (Of course, I will hasten to add that not EVERY Crumbcast is going to be about this. I’m sad but not quite THAT sad…) πŸ˜›

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            1. Vic, thank-you for pointing me over here, I really needed this laugh today. Now me, and my ribbed silos (wth?) will ride off into the sunset together, trying not to poke anyone’s eye out. πŸ˜‰

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              1. Lol! I know! Some of the names for breasts I’d never heard! But maybe they’re not American slang? It was so funny! I loved the Kinder Surprise for adults! Lol.
                Oh, Tony. πŸ˜„

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                1. Hee hee hee! Yes, some of them aren’t American terms, but I love ’em all equally! The terms I mean. Not the breasts. Oh… well, actually I love all those equally too. Ah crap… I’m digging another hole, aren’t I… πŸ˜›

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                    1. Lol. I love that a grown man can get that silly while talking about Orb Weavers. I think that’s a new one…not sure. Or it’s just a very bad spider. πŸ™‚

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      1. Oh, there could definitely be more of this variety, especially considering the Intimacy strip you did. I bet you could tie some more Juggalinos into all of that. Goodness knows we could blather on about boobs & intimacy, or boobs without intimacy for many, many days. πŸ™‚

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  3. Very nice breasts. Reminds me of the Annie Fannie cartoons in old time Playboy if you are familiar with that strip. Thank you for following my art blog, Tony. I love comics although I don’t have time to really read them like I would. I recently discovered some amazing sites for viewing/downloading Golden Age comics and the modern ones. Do you have a favorite comic strip?

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    1. Kinneret, thank you so much!

      Breasts are so much fun to draw because of course they come in all shapes and sizes. I think Annie Fanny is a good comparison because the waitress’s physique in this strip is certainly meant to evoke that classic bombshell style albeit in a more mundane setting.

      What sites did you find to view the Golden Age comics you speak of? (I have an abiding interest in that era of comic art.)

      As for my favourite comic strip, it would without a doubt have to be Charles M. Schulz’s Peanuts. It had a subtle, melancholy undertone that I picked up on even as a child. And it’s about one of the most idiosyncratic creations in comics that I’ve ever seen.

      I also enjoyed Murray Ball’s Footrot Flats and Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes quite a bit growing up. And, recently, I’ve been diving into Tove Jansson’s delightfully strange Moomin strips. πŸ™‚

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      1. I’ll have to check those out. It’s amazing when you think of Schulz how much he packed in in terms of psychology, personalities/personality disorders, anxiety, I mean you could almost teach abnormal psychology and counseling with his comic strips, and at the same time we all enjoyed them as kids without having any idea about all that. When I was growing up in the 70s/80s, I had some of the really early strips of his too that my Dad had. As much as many of them have held up in classic sense, there is definitely a time boundness to them. Which would happen with almost any literature. I agree with you about the melancholy… it was a great cartoon to read if you were a bit of an outcast or loner as a child. I loved Annie Fanny too (I started sneaking that out of my father’s closet at age 10 or so). I liked her much better than Crumb’s women who are so ugly and something dirty about his sexual portrayals whereas Annie was just hot, gorgeous, and the rich coloration and smooth lines of the comic strip was just so intoxicating. I’ll send a separate comment with the links.

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        1. You really know your comics history, Kinneret, and you clearly have a love of them that goes beyond an appreciation of mere aesthetics (although aesthetics are undoubtedly important too… it is art after all!).

          I’ve only caught up Annie Fanny in the last few years. There was something actually quite progressive about that character in that strip when one thinks about it. Yes, she was eye candy but she was also unapologetic about it. In fact, it was almost an afterthought for her. I suspect she wasn’t so much “innocent” as she was just light years ahead of the rest of us in terms of being truly liberated. I don’t know. That’s my take anyway.

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          1. I really don’t know my comics history at all. 😦 I wish I’d been more into it when I was younger. I got interested again when my son was going through a stage. And I got into DC Comics (way over Marvel). I also liked Archie and Lulu when I was young. Lulu IDK something about her was graphically pleasing. Archie only because Veronica and Betty were hot (I’m not a lesbian even though I probably sound like one.)

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            1. I laughed at the lesbian remark! Honestly, it wouldn’t bother me if you were or not but I get what you’re saying. Let’s face it… the female form is just so aesthetically pleasing. Couple that with a confident attitude and it’s a killer combination. There are many well written and drawn female characters in the Love and Rockets series by the Hernandez Bros. I don’t know if you’re familiar with them?

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              1. I’ll have to check that out. Well right..I’d say I was bi-friendly,:) Women are definitely hotter. As my husband says, men are like furniture. LOL. Although I guess gay guys don’t see it that way. I don’t know that series. Will have to look. I’m thinking actually now of doing my own illustrations for an erotic title because I found that it was so difficult to get good inexpensive erotic photographs. I would love to ask your opinion of them. (They need to be hot…basically I’m thinking along pinup lines.) Do you have an address I can email? tx

                Liked by 1 person

                1. Certainly! You can find my email here. And as for men being like furniture, your husband is spot on! I think it was described on Seinfeld once that men’s bodies are like jeeps. They’re utilitarian, made for getting around in. Pretty accurate description really. πŸ˜›

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  4. Dear Tony,

    I was going to stop at the last comic as it is after 11:00 PM here, but those boobs were too glorious for me to ignore as well.

    Also, have you seen “American Splendor”? It was a great movie about Harvey Pekar. Highly recommend.

    All My Love,
    Jennifer

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    1. It’s like Jerry Seinfeld once said: β€œLooking at cleavage is like looking at the sun. You don’t stare at it. It’s too risky. Ya get a sense of it and then you look away.” It’s a good thing I can draw it instead, although I’m pretty sure even that still makes me come across as a lecherous old pervert. Oh well, I guess it keeps me off the streets and out of trouble? :-/

      American Splendor is an amazing film! I thought Paul Giamatti was spot on as the late great Harvey Pekar, and I plan to see it again soon as it has been a few years since I first watched it. πŸ™‚

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    1. Mate, it’s great to see you commenting here! I’m so glad you’ve gotten to read some of my latest stuff, and even gladder that you love it! It was great talking to you yesterday! πŸ˜€

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  5. Great stuff. I snickered much. By my count, there are seven individually funny gags in that one, plus the snickery subtextual fact that you drew boobs uncannily like R. Crumb himself does.

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    1. I am a great admirer of the work of Robert Crumb. A fascinating man and a legendary artist!

      There was a documentary made about him quite a few years back called Crumb. I highly recommend it if you haven’t seen it yet, Murdock the Correctly-Spelt. πŸ˜‰

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